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Custom Timestamp in HTTP Receiver


  • I have a Mango installation on setup on a server which is being fed data over HTTP by a script running on a RasPi (reading from modbus).
    The Mango installation has a HTTP receiver data source configured with around 30 data points, all running perfectly fine. :-)

    However, I have a problem with the way Mango manages its timestamps. The time-stamp it uses is the actual time at which the POST message was received. This however, poses a problem as the data that was read over modbus might be older (due to network delays, or caching, or network down time etc) than the time it actually reaches Mango.

    I tried using this: "http://192.168.1.xx:8080/httpds?__time=yyyyMMddHHmmss&item1=val1&item2=val2" and sent ```
    time.strftime("%Y%m%d%H%M%S")

    
    
    P.S.: I tried installing Mango on RasPi but it had performance issues, couldn't read modbus as fast as the python script I wrote. However, the HTTP Publisher was a blessing with its auto-caching etc. :wink: 

  • What version of Mango and the HTTP Data Source are you using?


  • I'm currently using Mango M2M 1.12.4 as it offers unlimited data points. I know this is an Infinite Automation forum, but I'm hoping to get some help here.


  • No problem, we have a forum for discussion regarding earlier versions of Mango: http://forum.infiniteautomation.com/forum/forums/show/1.page you might get more assistance if you post it there.

    Also, the most recent version of Mango Automation has been optimized for low power computers and for small applications runs quite well on the Raspberry Pi so might be worth giving it a try.

    Thanks,

    Joel.